Tag Archives: Hercule Poirot

Poirot Loses A Client

Agatha Christie Collection

Title: Poirot Loses A Client (aka Dumb Witness)
Author: Agatha Christie
Publication Year: 1937
Pages: 234
Genre: Mystery
Count for Year: 53

How I discovered

I have joined Kerrie from Mysteries in Paradise with her Agatha Christie Reading Challenge and this is part of that.

The setup

In this intricate mystery, Poirot receives a letter — two months after it was written — from rich spinster Emily Arundell about a possible attempt on her life. Poirot heads to her hometown of Market Basing and finds her already dead. Poirot must contend with a cold trail and the strange villagers to solve a murder that confounds even his superior skills.

synopsis from Barnes & Noble (click cover to be taken to site)

The review

Even though Poirot could have just let this one go, because the client was already dead and it was not clear if a murder had been committed at first, Poirot, being Poirot, cannot let it go. Why? For Poirot, he must always get the truth — and the murderer, even if he/she thinks he/she got away with it.

As Poirot tells Capt. Hastings at one point during the investigation:

The dog hunts rabbits. Hercule Poirot hunts murderers. We have here a murderer– a murderer whose crimes failed, yes, perhaps, but nevertheless a murderer. And I, my friend, am going into the burrow after him — or her as the case may be.

As usual, “going into the burrow” after the murderer, with Poirot involves subterfuge, a.k.a. telling lies to other people. For example, at one point, he pretends to be a biographer for the family of the woman killed. Then later he acts the part of an investigator on how a brother and sister can break a will that was changed weeks before the death of the victim (in this case, their aunt).

Hastings asks Poirot if it is “really necessary to tell such elaborate lies,” to which Poirot responds:

“If one is going to tell a lie — and I notice, by the way, that your nature is very much averse to lying– now me, it does not trouble me at all–…if one is going to tell a lie at all, it might as well be an artistic lie, a romantic lie, a convincing lie!”

The usual suspects include family members and a devoted housekeeper, who seemed to benefit by receiving everything in the will over the relatives. However, naturally not all is at it seems with everyone having a motive and Poirot having to dig out the answer of who did it.

Personally, it had me guessing until the murder/murderess was revealed, and for that reason, I give this one a 4 out of 5.

My rating system:

5- Classic, must read
4- Worth owning a copy
3- Worth picking up at library
2- Worth skimming at the bookstore
1- Worth being a doorstop

This post also can be found on my main blog, an unfinished person (in an unfinished universe).

Poirot Loses A Client

Agatha Christie Collection

Title: Poirot Loses A Client (aka Dumb   Witness)
Author: Agatha Christie
Publication Year: 1937
Pages: 234
Genre: Mystery
Count for Year: 53

How I discovered

I have joined Kerrie from Mysteries in Paradise with her Agatha Christie Reading Challenge and this is part of that.

The setup

In this intricate mystery, Poirot receives a letter — two months after it was written — from rich spinster Emily Arundell about a possible attempt on her life. Poirot heads to her hometown of Market Basing and finds her already dead. Poirot must contend with a cold trail and the strange villagers to solve a murder that confounds even his superior skills.

synopsis from Barnes & Noble (click cover to be taken to site)

The review

Even though Poirot could have just let this one go, because the client was already dead and it was not clear if a murder had been committed at first, Poirot, being Poirot, cannot let it go. Why? For Poirot, he must always get the truth — and the murderer, even if he/she thinks he/she got away with it.

As Poirot tells Capt. Hastings at one point during the investigation:

The dog hunts rabbits. Hercule Poirot hunts murderers. We have here a murderer– a murderer whose crimes failed, yes, perhaps, but nevertheless a murderer. And I, my friend, am going into the burrow after him — or her as the case may be.

As usual, “going into the burrow” after the murderer, with Poirot involves subterfuge, a.k.a. telling lies to other people. For example, at one point, he pretends to be a biographer for the family of the woman killed. Then later he acts the part of an investigator on how a brother and sister can break a will that was changed weeks before the death of the victim (in this case, their aunt).

Hastings asks Poirot if it is “really necessary to tell such elaborate lies,” to which Poirot responds:

“If one is going to tell a lie — and I notice, by the way, that your nature is very much averse to lying– now me, it does not trouble me at all–…if one is going to tell a lie at all, it might as well be an artistic lie, a romantic lie, a convincing lie!”

The usual suspects include family members and a devoted housekeeper, who seemed to benefit by receiving everything in the will over the relatives. However, naturally not all is at it seems with everyone having a motive and Poirot having to dig out the answer of who did it.

Personally, it had me guessing until the murder/murderess was revealed, and for that reason, I give this one a 4 out of 5.

My rating system:

5- Classic, must read
4- Worth owning a copy
3- Worth picking up at library
2- Worth skimming at the bookstore
1- Worth being a doorstop

Tuesday’s Meme Things: What’s in a name and where I am this Tuesday

WG Spock[5]

For this week’s Weekly Geeks (click on button for full details), we were to explore the meaning of a favorite character name.

Of course, immediately I thought of the book I was reading at the time I first saw this week’s topic on Saturday. The book was Murder on the Links by Agatha Christie, and the character Hercule Poirot.

According to Think Baby Names, the name originates from…you might not have guessed this on your own…from the Latin form of the Greek god Herakles, the son of Zeus. It also says the name meant “Hera’s glory.” Baby Names World has a slightly more illuminating definition: “grandiose gift.” Baby Names.com adds that the name is…and I bet you never saw this one coming either…”associated with strength and power.”

So does Christie’s character exhibit this? But, mon ami, of course. One  has only to use the little gray cells and one can deduct it is so.

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tuesdaywhereareyou Raidergirl3 at an adventure in reading asks every Tuesday where you are in your reading. This week is no different (click button to see where raidergirl3 is this week as well as others who participate in this meme).

This week I’m in a Catholic parish somewhere in England with Fr. Hugh Kennedy in Edwin O’Connor’s The Edge of Sadness. So far, I’m only 30 pages into the book and it’s living up to its title. Fr. Kennedy is on his way to a birthday party for the father of a friend. He is accompanying his friend, who didn’t invite him to the party. His friend is a priest at a neighboring parish, which is thriving, while Fr. Kennedy is at a parish that is dying. For some reason, Fr. Kennedy has been relegated there, but we don’t know the reason yet.

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teasertuesdays3 Miz B. at Should Be Reading asks participants of the meme Teaser Tuesdays each week to: Grab your current read, let the book fall open to a random page, share two “teaser” sentences from that page, somewhere between lines 7 and 12. Also share the book from which you are reading so if others are interested, they can seek it out as well (click the button to see what books others are “teasing” this week).

This week’s book is Edwin O’Connor’s The Edge of Sadness, mentioned above.

Page 280:

But there also comes a change of atmosphere. Here the stillness of the night seems to have quite another quality from the stillness of the day; something far more positive than the mere absence of noise; there is a sense of solitude which is immense, boundless; one suddenly feels the consecrated space.